Each issue of PaperMoney is approximately 500 fact filled pages.
Logout
Click here for Pulp & Paper Radio International
Items just for you
New publication added! Advertising Arguments 2015 book
Free Downloads
Search
My Profile
Login
Management Side
Technical Side
U.S. House of Representatives Passes Legislation to Ban Illegal Wood Trade
Print
Washington, DC, USA, 14 May 2008 -- /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. House of Representatives today passed landmark legislation to address the global illegal logging crisis. The law would make the United States the first country in the world to prohibit the import, sale, or trade in illegally harvested wood and wood products.

The law amends a long-standing wildlife trafficking statute, the Lacey Act, to include timber, wood products, and other plants. It has been championed by Democratic Congressman Earl Blumenauer and Senator Ron Wyden, both of Oregon, and received strong bipartisan support in both Chambers of Congress. Reconciled language passed with the Farm Bill today. The Senate is expected to pass the bill tomorrow.

"After more than a year of work with an unprecedented coalition of industry, environmental, and union groups, today we passed legislation that will help bring an end to the egregious practice of illegal logging," said Blumenauer. "Not only does illegal logging threaten some of the world's richest and most vulnerable forests, but it leads to serious human rights violations. It also costs the U.S. forest products industry over USD 1 billion every year, including USD 130-USD 150 million to my home state of Oregon. This is a great achievement that will protect the environment, help honest businesses, and prevent rampant corruption both here and abroad."

The Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), the leading environmental organization providing expertise to policy makers on illegal logging and associated international trade, estimates that 10% of annual wood product imports into the United States -- worth some USD 3.8 billion dollars -- are derived from illegally logged timber.

Source: Environmental Investigation Agency


Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: