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Management Side
Technical Side
ECO2 Forests Develops Tree Tissue Culture
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Sacramento, California, USA, and Queensland, Australia, 05 February 2010 – ECO2 Forests Inc. (US Stock Symbol: ECOF), an international sustainable forestry company focused on carbon credit generation through reforestation, afforestation, and avoided deforestation projects, has developed a transportable tree tissue culture method that will facilitate global delivery of the company’s Kiri tree stock for reforestation and afforestation projects.

The tree tissue culture method will allow ECO2 Forests to deliver tree planting stock to projects globally because of the noncontaminant properties of the gel-like substance in which the stock is transported.

“This tree tissue culture technique is a major step forward for ECO2 Forests and allows us to comply with most quarantine regulations around the world. This is a critical point as we now have our importation method to supply the required quantity of tissue culture to almost  anywhere in the world where it is then propagated in nurseries before being planted as part of our Global Forestry Plan,” said Ray Smith, ECO2 Forests Asia Pacific managing director.

Tissue culture in noncontaminant gel does not threaten or damage native vegetation, a primary issue when transporting trees and plants across international borders.

“Tissue cultured plants contain no contaminants and hence allow us to comply with quarantine regulations globally. This dramatically reduces the transportation time from point ‘A’ to point ‘B,’ saving valuable time and expense and the end result of planting trees more quickly," Smith said.

The positive end result of the tissue culture method affords ECO2 Forests the ability to provide global distribution to strategic projects and have Kiri trees growing in the ground just months after the tissue culture is sent, maximizing forest growth cycles.


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